Scientists have developed a paint that can cool buildings, reflecting up to 98% of the incoming heat

Scientists have developed a paint that can cool buildings, reflecting up to 98% of the incoming heat

The research team provided a method for creating improved white paint, which when applied to the roof or exterior walls of a building reflects up to 98% of infrared radiation from the sun.

Everyone knows that white clothing better reflects light and heats up less, so it is more comfortable in hot weather. This principle also works for other objects, such as buildings. However, existing white paints reflect a maximum of 85% of solar radiation, and absorb the rest of the energy.

A team from the University of California, Los Angeles decided to improve this figure to use paint for passive radiation cooling in the daytime.

To do this, instead of titanium oxide, they used cheaper ingredients such as barite and teflon, reduced the concentration of polymer binders that absorb heat well, and made other small changes in the composition.

As a result of all the modifications, the resulting paint is able to reflect up to 98% of the incoming radiation, lowering the temperature in the room and helping to save on its cooling.

Earlier, we also reported on the development of a simple system of passive heat removal from buildings, which will help fight heat without electricity.

, UCLA

Scientists have developed a paint that can cool buildings, reflecting up to 98% of the incoming heat

Leave a Comment