Wearable patch for non-invasive skin cancer treatment invented

Wearable patch for non-invasive skin cancer treatment invented

Researchers have developed a soluble nano-needle patch that provides non-invasive drug delivery for treating melanoma through the skin.

Traditional treatments for skin cancer, such as radiation and chemotherapy, harm the entire body and cause a lot of side effects. Even progressive methods include drug delivery through polymer microneedles, which quickly dissolve, requiring regular repetition of the painful administration procedure. Therefore, a team of bioengineers from Purdue University has created a new wearable patch to solve these problems.

It consists of a thin, flexible and water-soluble medical film with silicon nano-needles that do not harm the body and dissolve naturally with tissue fluid within a few months. The film acts as a temporary platform to simplify the placement of the matrix of nano-needles on the desired area of ​​the skin and dissolves with water within one minute.

The nano-needles themselves have pointed cone-shaped ends, so they easily and painlessly penetrate the skin. In addition to the base hole, they have lateral pores, which improves the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to tissues for targeted treatment of melanoma.

Thanks to the development of nanotechnology, non-invasive methods of treatment are developing rapidly, and earlier we reported on the development of a “smart” patch for healing chronic wounds.

, heaclub, Purdue University

Wearable patch for non-invasive skin cancer treatment invented

Leave a Comment